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Allman Brothers Band, The - macon city auditorium, macon. ga 2/11/72 [2013]
2 CD-Set! Die Veröffentlichung rarer, historischer Konzerte aus den umfangreichen Archiven der Allman Brothers findet endlich ihre Fortsetzung. Nach "American university 12/13/70" und "S.U.N.Y. at Stonybrook, NY 9.19.71" folgt nun ein großartiges Konzert aus der schwierigen, aber sehr bedeutungsvollen, weil emotionalen Phase der Band zwischen November 1971 und Herbst 1972, der so genannten "Five-Man Band" Ära, als man nach dem tragischen Tod des unvergessenen Duane Allman am 29. Oktober 1971 beschloß, zunächst nur mit Dickey Betts, also ohne zweiten Gitarristen, weiter zu machen. In dieser Zeit wurde der Meilenstein der Band "Eat a peach" fertiggestellt, aus dem einige absolute Klassiker hervorgingen, wie etwa "Melissa", "Ain't wastin' time no more" und "Les brers in a minor". Das nun veröffentlichte Konzert ist eine ganz besondere Show, denn es war die erste Performance der Band in ihrer Heimatstadt Macon nach dem Verlust von Duane. Und es wurde ein fantastischer Auftritt an jenem 11. Februar 1972 im Macon City Auditorium von Macon/Georgia. Wunderbar, dass diese Show nun endlich offiziell für die unzähligen Fans dieser legendären Band zugänglich gemacht wurde.

Das schreibt "Hittin' The Note", das renommierte, den Allman Brothers nahe stehende, Jamrock-Magazin über diese DoCD:

In the 35 year existence of the Allman Brothers Band, the 11-month period of time from November 1971, to the fall of 1972 - often referred to as the "Five-Man Band" era - is an extremely important, emotionally charged, and yet often overlooked chapter of ABB history. On October 29, 1971, the band lost its founder, spiritual leader, and guiding force when guitarist Duane Allman was killed in a motorcycle crash in Macon, Georgia. Words cannot describe the magnitude of devastation that hit the group, but the notion that the band might call it quits was quickly discounted - Duane would have wanted them to play on, so play on they did. Replacing Duane with another guitarist, however, was not an option, so the Allman Brothers decided to move forward as a quintet. They finished recording the studio album that they were working on at the time of Duane's passing - subsequently entitled Eat a Peach - and produced three classic tracks; "Ain't Wastin' Time No More," "Melissa," and "Les Brers in A Minor."

The remaining members - Gregg Allman on vocals and keyboards, Dickey Betts on guitar, Berry Oakley on bass, and drummers Butch Trucks and Jaimoe - hit the stage less than a month after Duane's death, and the music that literally burned with passion served as the best possible form of grieving. At the same time, their style of music was forced to change - missing were the dual harmony lines of Duane and Dickey, as well as Duane's slide guitar mastery. As a result, responsibilities shifted within the group. Aside from now being the only guitarist in a traditional two-guitar line-up, Dickey also took on the unenviable task of playing Duane's slide parts on some of the band's signature tunes, a challenge he more than met - Dickey displayed a versatility that few knew he possessed. Gregg stepped up his Hammond B-3 playing, and his vocals were more important than ever. It was Berry Oakley, however, who underwent the largest transformation. Berry had always played bass like a third guitarist, but with Duane gone, Oakley's playing became monstrous - his thundering lines filled all sorts of voids in the music with an emotion and splendor that was part evil, part magic.

This two-CD package is taken from a show at the Macon Auditorium on February 11, 1972. It was the band's 23rd show without Duane, and the first in their hometown since his loss. Playing two sets that day, the band put on a five-star performance - the music sounded comfortable, natural, and powerful.

After Gregg dedicated the show to "Brother Duane," the Allmans launched into "Statesboro Blues" with Dickey's country-flavored slide and Berry's prowling bass setting the tone, which carried over into a lean "Done Somebody Wrong." Gregg then announced a new song, "Ain't Wastin' Time No More," which was Eat a Peach poignant. A cooking "One Way Out" has Gregg on piano duplicating Duane's slide riff, and then comes a version of "Midnight Rider" with Dickey and Berry combining forces to make up for Duane's absence. The 21-minute "You Don't Love Me" absolutely belongs to Dickey Betts, who delivers a majestic, soaring run that encapsulates the utmost brilliance of his skills. Gregg shines on a sultry "Stormy Monday," which gives way to "Hoochie Coochie Man," where Oakley's whimsical vocals are in stark contrast to his precise bass playing, and "Hot 'Lanta" shows that the ABB could still swing like a jazz band.

Disc Two kicks off with "Les Brers in A Minor," and Berry's bass surges like a tide as Dickey blisters the fretboard, with Butch and Jaimoe underneath, pushing everyone along. "Trouble No More" - sans slide- segues into Berry's renowned opening to "Whipping Post," which showcases a compelling solo by Dickey that climaxes with a maddening crescendo. It was the perfect closer to a day when the Allman Brothers truly were hittin' the note for the folks in Macon.

By the late summer of 1972, the group found itself going through an unplanned but fulfilling transition. During this time, a series of informal jams with the Allman Brothers and a hot young keyboardist named Chuck Leavell took place, and the musical dialogue spoke volumes. The solution to filling out the band's sound became clear - instead of adding another guitarist, they would bring in Chuck's piano as a second lead instrument, and in October 1972, they entered Capricorn Studios to begin work on their next record. After 92 shows, the "Five-Man Band" segment of the Allman Brothers ended on November 2, 1972, when the new line-up played its first gig at Hofstra University, which was taped for ABC's late-night program, In Concert.

Just as the band seemed to be righting itself and heading in a new direction, tragedy struck again. On November 11, 1972, Berry Oakley was killed when his motorcycle collided with a city bus in Macon, only three blocks from the site of Duane's fatal crash. Despite the incomprehensible loss of another Brother, the ABB gamely moved on, adding Lamar Williams on bass and finishing the album Brothers and Sisters, which was dedicated to Berry.

Enjoy this special slice of Allman Brothers' history - just crank up that bass and let 'er boom, 'cause that's what B.O. woulda wanted.

John Lynskey
Hittin' the Note Magazine

Die komplette Setlist:

Disc 1
1. Statesboro Blues - 5:38
2. Done Somebody Wrong - 3:45
3. Ain't Wastin' Time No More - 4:56
4. One Way Out - 6:58
5. Midnight Rider - 3:14
6. You Don't Love Me - 21:32
7. Stormy Monday - 8:26
8. Hoochie Coochie Man - 4:49
9. Hot 'Lanta - 6:18

Disc 2
1. Les Brers In A Minor - 11:55
2. Trouble No More - 3:53
3. Whipping Post - 16:10

Art-Nr.: 8058
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Rock
Status: Angebot || Typ: CD || Preis: € 11,90

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Anderson, Terry and the Olympic Ass-Kickin Team - national champions [2009]
Endlich! 4 Jahre nach dem "affenstarken" Debut und einem zwischenzeitlichen Live-Album kommt nun der Studio-Nachfolger - und Leute, was macht das "Ding" wieder für eine Laune! Terry Anderson, Dan Baird's alter Kumpel aus dem Georgia Satellites- und Yayhoos-Dunstkreis, und sein bravouröses "Olympic Ass-kickin' Team" blasen zur Roots-rockin', Guitar rockin', Boogie-rockin', Pub-rockin', Power-Fun Pop-Rock'n Roll-Party des Jahres! Welch eine Energie! Welch ein Spielwitz! Welch ein Spaß! Anderson, von Hause aus ein wirklich famoser Drummer, Sänger und Songwriter (seine bekanntesten Songs sind sicher Georgia Satellites' Edel-Rocker "Battleship chains" und Dan Baird's berühmtes "I love you period") hat mit dem "OAK-Team" eine Schar ganz exzellenter Musiker um sich versammelt, die sich mit dem "alten Veteranen" geradezu blind verstehen. Neben Terry Anderson sind das der bärenstarke Gitarrist Dave Bartholomew, Keyboarder Greg Rice und Bassmann Jack Cornell. Höchst interessant ist, und das unterstreicht die ganze Klasse der Akteure, dass nahezu alle Musiker neben Ihrem Hauptinstrument bei dem ein oder anderen Songs zusätzlich aushelfen - und zwar mit dem "Handwerkszeug" der Kollegen. So mimt beispielsweise Terry Anderson bei bei der Hälfte der 12 Songs den zweiten Gitarristen (und auch das kann er hervorragend), der etatmäßige "Saitenverbieger" Bartholomew übernimmt bei einem Track Anderson's "Schiessbude" und Bassist Jack Cornell spielt bei zwei Nummern ebenfalls Gitarre. Eine vielseitige Truppe, deren Variabilität sich auch in der Vielseitigkeit der Songs niederschlägt. In den Nummern, obwohl total geradeaus und straight gespielt, steckt soviel Raffinesse, soviel "Fun" und soviel Spielfreude. Die Zutaten, aus denen das "OAK-Team" sein prächtiges Power Party Rock'n Roll-Gebräu anrührt, reichen vom klassischen Gitarren-Rootsrock, über den Southern Rock, den Countryrock, den britischen Pubrock der Siebziger, bis hin zum puren Classic-Rock der Marke Rolling Stones, Georgia Satellites, Dan Baird, ZZ Top, The Replacements, The Who, NRBQ, Rockpile und Dave Edmunds (Rick Cornell, ein Reporter vom "Independent" aus Raleigh/NC bezeichnete Anderson einst als North Carolina's Antwort auf Dave Edmunds). Alles steckt voller Schwung, Drive und spürbarem Spaß! Selbst vermeintliche Balladen strahlen jede Menge Energie aus. Stellvertretend für ein durch und durch tolles Album ohne jeden Ausfall hier ein paar Songbeispiele, die wir etwas näher vorstellen: So zum Beispiel der famose Opener "Goin' or comin'", ein baumstarker, straighter Riff-/Shuffle-/Roots Rock-Knaller, voller "trinkfestem" Roadhouse-/Honky Tonk-/Southern-Flair, dreckig und ungemein knackig! Anderson's prägnantes Drumming "knallt" wie ein Uhrwerk. Tolle E-Gitarren-Arbeit! Oder der fabelhafte, balladeske Rootsrocker "Lost your number" mit seinen tollen, satten Riffs, seiner klasse Melodie (im übrigen bleiben alle Tracks prächtig hängen) und den traumhaft ineinander übergehenden, ausgiebeigen Soli von Greg Rice's vollsoundiger Hammond Orgel und Dave Bartholomew's rotziger Lead Gitarre. Große Klasse! Wie auch beispielsweise das voller schönem Retro Sixties Beat-Flair steckende, sehr melodische "About you" (da kommen einem unweigerlich die legendären Brinsley Schwarz in Erinnerung) mit seiner vollmundigen, transparenten Gitarren-Begleitung, der lockere, aber gleichzeitig sehr kernige, schwungvolle, mit würziger Piano- und E-Gitarren-Begleitung forcierte Boogie "Indy 500", das herrliche "Found mission", das sich anhört als träfen die Beach Boys auf die Georgia Satellites (ein toller, "happy" und "sunny" Retro Rock'n Roll-Spaß zum Abtanzen), oder auch der ungeheuer lustige, abgehende, großartige Hi-Energy Power Rock-/Pop-Knaller "Pow'ful Merka" (Terry Anderson trommerlt wie ein "Tier"), mit dem wohl jede Rock'n Roll-Fete in Schwung kommt (wer da nicht völlig abgeht, dem ist wohl der Makel einer "Spaßbremse" nicht mehr zu nehmen)! Grandios auch der fulminante Fetzer "Is we or ain't we", der aus den Lautsprechern fegt, als wäre es ein vergessener Who-Klassiker - sowohl gesanglich (der Refrain erinnert an typische Daltrey/Townshend-Harmonies), als auch musikalisch (Anderson verprügelt sein Schlagzeug wie ein wildgewordener Keith Moon)! Verdammt, ist diese Truppe gut! Nicht nur die Dan Baird-, Dave Edmunds-, und Yayhoos-Fans werden daran ihre helle Freude haben. Nein, dieses olympische "Ass-kickin' Team", darf auf keiner Rock'n Roll-Fete, die etwas auf sich hält, fehlen. "Bad-assed Roots-rocking Power Pop, well done and fun from start to finish"! Wahre Champions eben!

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1 Goin' or Comin' - 4:24   
2 Willie Mays - 3:27   
3 Lost Your Number - 3:19   
4 You Had Me at Get Lost - 3:17   
5 Is We or Ain't We - 2:57   
6 Indy 500 - 3:13   
7 About You - 3:01   
8 Pow'ful 'Merka - 3:26   
9 Wrong for That - 4:55   
10 Lover Like That - 3:10   
11 Found Missin' - 2:50   
12 Feel Right Now - 2:58

Art-Nr.: 6388
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Rock
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 16,90

In folgende Titel können Sie reinhören:
Goin' or comin'
Willie Mays
Lost your number
Is we or ain't we
Indy 500
Pow'ful 'Merka

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Blues Traveler - hurry up & hang around [2018]
Sie sind noch immer, bzw. wieder, in einer fantastischen Verfassung. Die großartigen Root-/Jamrock-Veteranen um Mastermind und Harp-Wizard John Popper präsentieren mit ihrem neuen, nunmehr 13. Studioalbum, ein absolutes Prachtteil ab, das die große Blues Traveler-Fanbase vollstens überzeugen wird. Tolles Songmaterial, große Spielfreude, hervorragend hängen bleibendes Material, Abwechslungsreichtum - einfach stark!

Hier noch ein Original U.S.-Review:

Blues Traveler has always been a band that lets their sound, travel, if you will. Along the winding path of their career, the one constant has been change. "Save His Soul" sounded nothing like "Four", which sounded nothing like "Truth Be Told", which sounded nothing like "Blow Up The Moon". They have always been chasing something, but what exactly that is has always been nebulous. In the beginning, the strove for respect. Then they strove for the status they deserved. Then they strove to regain their place. And finally, they strove to make themselves happy. That leaves us with a string of records that hold together, but form a patchwork that draws your attention to a different area each time. And even when they are taking a detour that might not be your choice, there are always interesting twists that make it worth your while to take the ride with them.
With the band having reached a milestone of longevity, the question of how to commemorate that brings them back (nearly) full circle. While their last couple records have seen Blues Traveler injecting their sound with pop songwriters in the search for the perfect collaboration, "Hurry Up & Hang Around" finds them stripping back to the garage band they started out as. This is the most classically Blues Traveler album they have made, in approach, in many a year.
Our first taste of this chapter came from the opening track, "Accelerated Nation", which came out of the gates in traditional Blues Traveler form. Sounding like a mix of all their eras, the song fused their classic sound with the polished writing of their modern work, giving us a song that fits the same mold "Most Precarious" did (and sadly never got credit for - that was a better single than it is remembered as).
Longtime fans will recognize bits and pieces that should evoke a smile, like how John Popper's melody in the verses of "She Becomes My Way" stretches a syllable or two longer than anyone else would write it. Those are the details that I have always appreciated, both as a fan and as a songwriter. Every writer and every band has idiosyncrasies that pop up, which I think got too smoothed out with the amount of collaboration they had been doing lately. Even when they were writing great songs, like "Matador" was, they didn't have those trademark elements. Hearing them again is a treat.
Another one pops up on "Daddy Went A Giggin'", where Popper's melody in the verses, and some of the feel of the instrumental, is somewhat pulled from his solo album, "Zygote" (the song "His Own Hands" in particular). The songwriting on this record is a throwback to the "Four" and "Straight On Til Morning" period, but more concise than they were back then. The band has been constantly trimming away the excess from their old tendencies, which leaves us with a lean record. Old fans might think there's a looseness missing from the recordings, but it shows how their focus has shifted over the years towards sharp songwriting.
The thing about being a Blues Traveler fan is that we can argue over which of their experiments are our favorites. Some of us will love how gritty and heavy they got on "Bastardos!", while others will appreciate the slickness of "Truth Be Told". This one, though, feels like the right record for an anniversary period, because it is the one record since "Four" that best captures every side of the band.
Given how much the world has changed since "Run Around" and "Hook" were near the top of the charts, it's a good decision that the band is no longer trying to chase a hit, and is instead writing music that is befitting of their status. There are clover hooks and strong melodies, but they integrate into the core of the band's sound, rather than sounding like the token attempt to appeal to a demographic that no longer exists. Look, I love "Girl Inside My Head" and "Amber Awaits" too, but even then there no longer existed the proper outlet for them to become mainstream hits.
"Hurry Up & Hang Around" is a record made for Blues Traveler fans by the biggest fans of them all, the band. At this stage of their career, that's exactly what most people want to hear. And listening to the results, I can't argue. This record will make any Blues Traveler fan happy, and it will reset things so the next experiment is more welcome. (Bloody Good Music / Chris C)

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1. Accelerated Nation - 3:04
2. She Becomes My Way - 3:51
3. The Touch She Has - 4:22
4. When You Fall Down - 3:32
5. The Wolf Is Bumpin - 3:48
6. Daddy Went a Giggin - 3:43
7. Tangle Of Our Dreaming - 3:36
8. More Than Truth - 3:02
9. Prayer Upon The Wind - 2:20
10. Miss Olympus - 4:02
11. Phone Call From Leavenworth - 4:35
12. Ode From The Aspect - 4:55

Art-Nr.: 9717
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Rock
Status: Neuheit || Typ: CD || Preis: € 15,90

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Brooks, Kix - new to this town [2012]
Brooks & Dunn sind Geschichte, doch nach Ronnie Dunn kommt nun auch die andere Häfte des erfolgreichsten Country-Duos aller Zeiten mit einem Solo-Album! "New to this town" heisst das hervorragend gelungene Werk, mit dem Kix Brooks eindrucksvoll offenbart, was er auch ohne seinen kongenialen Partner in der Lage zu leisten ist. 12 starke Nummern, zumeist sehr kraftvoll und knackig in Szene gesetzt (der Balladen-Anteil ist klar in der Minderzahl), zwischen traditionellen Anlagen und sehr abwechslungsreichem, zuweilen durchaus rockigem New Country. Gast, Slide-Gitarrist und Duett-Partner beim Titelstück ust übrigens Joe Walsh (The Eagles). Die Musik passt durchaus zur Philosophie, die auch Brooks & Dunn verkörperten, hat aber auch ihren eigenen Pep. Die Melodien sind prima! Gratulation an Kix Brooks zu diesem großartigen Album!

Wen es interessiert: Hier im Original eine sehr ausführliche, aktuelle Biographie mit der Geschichte zum neuen Album im Original-Wortlaut:

"Wish I was new to this town
Just pullin’ in checking it out for the first time”
— “New to This Town” by Kix Brooks, Marv Green and Terry McBride

It’s been more than 30 years since Kix Brooks was new to the town that he made his home, where he married, raised two children and built an accomplished career as a songwriter, singer and half of the most successful duo in country music history, a weekly national radio show host, magazine columnist, film producer, actor, winery owner and active and influential member of the music industry and community at large.

And yet here he is, picking up where he started when he really was new to this town, when his very first solo single in 1983 lumbered up the country chart to #73 before being hijacked by gravity into oblivion.

“New to This Town” is the title cut from the album that he hopes will reintroduce him to music fans, not exactly as a brand new man—to borrow a phrase from a song he co-wrote many moons ago—but as his own man, with his own songs to sing and his own unique story to tell.
Though the song is about a romantic relationship, metaphorically it suggests another interpretation. “When you’re starting out, there’s so much fear that if you screw up or put out the wrong record, you’ve lost that chance to live your dream. At this point in my career, there’s a different kind of uncertainty and risk that the people who have seen me perform for 20 years as half of Brooks & Dunn won’t be able to see me as anything but that. So in that sense, being new to town would be good to be able to do again.”

Kix Brooks’ career as a musician began long before he came to Nashville, which is less than 100 miles from where the Louisiana native was shipped off for high school at Tennessee’s Sewanee Military Academy. “I wasn’t bad, but I wasn’t good,” he confesses with a smile. “The discipline was good for me. It gave me structure and problem-solving skills, which are really helpful for creative people.”

Brooks grew up in a musical family, had his first guitar before he hit his teens, and while in Sewanee, he began playing coffee houses with his roommate, Nashville native Jody Williams. “Jody turned me on to the Opry,” expanding the range of country music that Brooks already loved. “I was a fan of bluegrass, rock and outlaw country, people like Willie, Cash and Roger Miller. I loved the Allman Brothers, Leon Russell, the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Asleep at the Wheel, Guy Clark, Jerry Jeff Walker. ”
After graduation, he went to Louisiana Tech, gaining a foundational education in reading music and the theory of composition while getting hands-on experience playing clubs around town. Realizing that he wasn’t cut out to be in the marching band, school choir, or orchestra—which were required for a music degree—he switched his major to speech and got into theater, both of which would later serve him well.

A brief sabbatical from school led him to Alaska in 1976, working for his dad, a pipeline contractor. The job was great seed money, he recalls, “So when I got home, I bought a new car, a new guitar, a bottle of whiskey, and I was ready to get back at it.

“I had a band and I did some solo stuff. I could bang on a guitar and open up for just about anybody playing clubs in Shreveport. My plan was to be somebody.”
But an invitation from his sister put “Plan A” on hold. “She called me out of the blue and asked if I would come to Maine and help her with a television production company. So I was doing radio and television production, commercials, and it was a great experience. But I was also playing clubs and was still drawn to that. I enjoyed advertising, I enjoyed Maine. But in my heart of hearts, I just wanted to play music.”

So he took off again for Louisiana but stopped in Nashville to visit with his old roommate Jody Williams. “We stayed up all night talking and playing music, and Jody tried to talk me into staying. He said I could make a living writing songs. I said, ‘A, you’re nuts, and B, I’m going to New Orleans to play music.’”
But as fun as it was, the pace—and the partying—began to take a toll. “I called Jody up and said, ‘Do you really think I could make a living writing songs?’ and he said, ‘Get your ass up here!’”

True to his word, Williams gave Brooks a place to crash and found him a job with a concert production company while arranging meetings for him with music publishers around town.

“Everybody was really nice for about half a song, and then I wrote some more songs and called them back, and everyone was always out to lunch. So I started breaking songs down and figuring out what these guys were doing, which doesn’t mean you can do it, but at least I did my homework and really started working harder at trying to figure out how to do it. I realized it was one thing to make people smile in bars and another thing to make a living as a songwriter in Nashville.”
His hard work paid off, and less than two years after pulling into town, Brooks had a publishing deal and a #1 cut. Some things didn’t pan out, like his first album in 1983 on a label that went defunct before the album was released and a 1989 album on Capitol that went nowhere fast.
But he was making a living—a good living—writing songs for Tree Publishing, where exec Paul Worley took some of his demos to veteran music man Tim DuBois, head of the Arista Nashville record label. DuBois suggested that Brooks write with the winner of a talent competition, a tall, big-voiced Texan named Ronnie Dunn. When DuBois heard their song demos, the rest became Brooks & Dunn history.

In their 20-year ride, the duo recorded 10 studio albums, released 50 singles, scored 23 #1 hits, sold more than 30 million albums, sold out tours from coast to coast and became one of the most awarded acts in country music history.

But in August of 2009, they revealed what had long been a topic between the partners themselves: that after a final tour and a final compilation album, Brooks & Dunn would be no more.

“It was always an arranged marriage that happened to work out really well and produce some great kids. But after 20 amazing, dream-like years, it was time.”
As for the notion of recording a solo album, Brooks took his time—or as much time as realistic for someone who owns a thriving winery, hosts a weekly syndicated radio show, forms a film production company, takes on roles in three movies and writes all but one of the songs for the soundtrack for the western To Kill a Memory, as well as co-writing the soundtrack for a Christmas movie.

“I have a lot of interests, and I wasn’t at that point thinking of what I would do next. I was kind of looking forward to chilling for a year or so. I wanted to take my time. I started writing during the last B&D tour, and when we got done, I kept writing while we were making movies.”
When the time felt right, Brooks approached his album with customary enthusiasm, producing and recording nearly 50 songs before beginning the challenging process of narrowing the field. “There were a few like [the Brooks/Leslie Satcher co-write] ‘Moonshine Road’ that I was sort of building the album around,” he says, “so you try to take the ones that fit the other songs the best, that fit you best, or where the track is just smoking.”

The result is a record that is emphatically and uniquely Kix Brooks—rocking, smoky, swampy and bluesy, with belts of bayou and hits of Cajun zydeco. Nine of the album’s dozen tracks bear Brooks’ name as a co-writer, collaborating with such longtime friends and writing luminaries as Bob DiPiero and David Lee Murphy (on the lyrically clever “Closin’ Time at Home”), Rhett Akins and Dallas Davidson (for the mid-tempo musical celebration of “Bring It on Home”), and Marv Green and Terry McBride on “New to This Town,” the title track single that almost didn’t make the album.

“We were kind of done with everything, I had recorded the album, and Jay DeMarcus and I were doing the soundtrack for a Christmas movie over at his house. But I was thinking about that song, so he was nice enough to help me produce it and let me use the pickers while we were working there. He really liked the song, so I said, ‘Let’s do it together.’”

Later, “The engineer from my radio show said, ‘You ought to get some Joe Walsh-sounding slide on that.’ I’m like, ‘Hmm, what if I could get Joe Walsh?’ My manager is partners with Irving Azoff, who sent it to Joe, and he called me up and put the slide on there for me. So that worked out great.”
In a new-to-this-town, full-circle touch, the album also features two songs that Brooks wrote with Rafe Van Hoy. With Deborah Allen, they penned Brooks’ first #1 as a songwriter (John Conlee’s ’83 chart-topper, “I’m Only in It for the Love”), and they pair here on the backsliding fun of “Complete 360” and team with Curly Putman on the groove-and-soul-filled, after-hours portrait of “my baby’s” “Tattoo.”

Now, with his album complete, Brooks is just looking forward to getting it into the hands of fans and resuming the solo career that began long ago when his entire plan “was to be somebody.”

“That fear I had at one point in my career where you’re scared to death to make the wrong move, I don’t feel that way now. But you still really want to do something that is relevant and makes people rock, and look out at a crowd and know you have connected, you’ve hit that nerve. I don’t think you ever get over that.”

(This biography was provided by the artist or their representative.)

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1. New to this Town - 4:20
2. Moonshine Road - 4:21
3. Bring It On Home - 3:44
4. There's the Sun - 3:05
5. Complete 360 - 3:16
6. My Baby - 2:55
7. Tattoo - 3:25
8. In the Right Place - 3:47
9. Next to That Woman - 3:21
10. Let's Do This Thing - 2:57
11. Closin' Time at Home - 3:37
12. She Knew I Was a Cowboy - 3:22

Art-Nr.: 7907
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Country
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 13,90

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Castro, Tommy & The Painkillers - method to my madness [2015]
Der großartige Bluesrock-Veteran und exzellente Gitarrist Tommy Castro legt mit seiner baumstarken, aktuellen Formation, den Painkillers, den Nachfolger zu seinem letztjährigen, famosen "The devil you know" vor und zeigt eindrucksvoll, in welch blendender Verfassung er und seine Jungs nach wie vor aufspielen. Bestens groovender, funky, classic, soulful Blues und Bluesrock, umgesetzt in exzellentem Songmaterial. Sehr inspiriert! Klasse Album!

Die Produktbeschreibung im Original:

Night after night, Tommy Castro, a fierce and fiery road warrior, fervently delivers his driving, blues-soaked, soul-baring music to fans all over the world. Over the course of his four-decade career, Castro has played thousands of shows to hundreds of thousands of fans, packing dance floors, always leaving them screaming for more. He and his band, The Painkillers (currently featuring bassist Randy McDonald, keyboardist Michael Emerson and drummer Bowen Brown), play music that is guaranteed to fire up fans and with Method To My Madness, the group turns the intensity up another notch. “My main objective when making a new album,” says Castro, “is to do something different from before. I’ve always been a blues guy; it’s what I’m meant to do. But I’m always listening and reacting to what’s going on in the outside world, experimenting with my guitar tone and my songwriting approach to constantly keep my music fresh. In the end, though, my brand is on every song.” Method To My Madness finds Tommy Castro And The Painkillers at their very best. It is instantly a career-defining highlight in a lifetime full of them. From the opening one-two punch of everyman anthems Common Ground and Shine A Light to the full-tilt energy of the title track to the searing, deep soul ballad Died And Gone To Heaven, Tommy and the band are firing on all cylinders. From the bayou rock of Got A Lot and the atmospheric, autobiographical Ride to the reinvented version of the Clarence Carter hit I’m Qualified and the emotional cover of B.B. King’s Bad Luck, Tommy Castro And The Painkillers continue to break new ground while simultaneously having an incredible amount of fun. After spending his 20s gigging around in a variety of San Francisco-area blues and soul bands, Castro joined Warner Brothers’ artists The Dynatones in the late 1980s before forming The Tommy Castro Band in 1991. He released his debut album in 1996 on Blind Pig and hit the road hard, picking up new fans everywhere he went. In the mid-1990s The Tommy Castro Band served as the house band for three seasons on NBC Television’s Comedy Showcase (airing right after Saturday Night Live), bringing him in front of millions of viewers every week. During the 1990s and into the 2000s, Castro released a series of critically acclaimed CDs for Blind Pig, Telarc and 33rd Street Records, as well as one on his own Heart And Soul label. Castro joined Alligator Records in 2009, releasing Hard Believer and winning four of his six career Blues Music Awards including the coveted B.B. King Entertainer Of The Year Award (the very highest award a blues performer can receive). His song Hard Believer took first place in the blues category of the International Songwriting Competition. Castro formed The Painkillers in 2012, creating a lean, mean four-piece lineup and leaving his tight horn section behind. Fueled by Tommy’s voice and guitar plus bass, drums and keyboards, the band released The Devil You Know in 2014, winning over hordes of new fans. Castro stripped his music down to its raw essence with the band hammering their point home on the bandstand. Jambands declared, “Tommy Castro And The Painkillers are a crackling, stripped-down band with plenty of grit and a rocking soul.” Now, with Method To My Madness, Tommy Castro And The Painkillers are ready to unleash their new songs on music fans everywhere. “With the new album,” Castro says, “I was trying to get back to my basic ingredients: blues and soul. I went for the energy of connecting with my band. We kept everything raw, capturing the feeling of playing live. I’m not about being perfect,” he says, summing up. “I’m about being real.” Clearly that is the method to his madness.

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1. Common Ground - 4:14
2. Shine A Light - 4:34
3. Method To My Madness - 3:14
4. Died And Gone To Heaven - 5:02
5. Got A Lot - 3:50
6. No Such Luck - 4:23
7. Two Hearts - 3:40
8. I'm Qualified - 3:10
9. Ride - 4:40
10. Lose Lose - 5:17
11. All About The Cash - 4:31
12. Bad Luck - 3:27

Art-Nr.: 9005
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Rock
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 16,90

In folgende Titel können Sie reinhören:
Common ground
Shine a light
Method to my madness
Died and gone to heaven
Got a lot
No such luck
Two hearts
All about the cash

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Civil Wars, The - same [2013]
Sehnlichst erwartetes Follow-Up des grandiosen Americana-/Singer-Songwriter-/Alternative Country-/Folk Rock-Duos Joy Williams und John Paul White zu dem mit 3 Grammys dekorierten, frenetisch gefeierten Debut "Barton hollow". The Civil Wars machen genau da weiter, wo sie mit ihrem Vorgänger aufgehört haben. Songmaterial und Performance sind exzellent!

Kurze Original-Produktinfo:
The Civil Wars' highly anticipated sophomore self-titled album is the follow up to the three-time Grammy Award-winning duo's acclaimed debut, Barton Hollow.
The Civil Wars was recorded in Nashville between August 2012 and January 2013. Charlie Peacock was once again at the helm as producer for the album. Additionally, Rick Rubin produced the duo's performance for the track "I Had Me a Girl" in August of 2011. Peacock later completed the track by producing the instrumentation and mix.

Exklusives "Track by Track"-Review zu allen Stücken des Albums von Joy Williams:

THE ONE THAT GOT AWAY

This song pays homage to regret. Nearly everybody I've come across has somebody in their life that they wonder what life would be like if they'd never met that person. It's that sliding-door moment -- in the blink of an eye everything could change. Either for the positive or the negative.
John Paul and I wrote this song in the screened-in porch of my and Nate's new home. I remember warm breezes blowing, a mild day. I had recently had my son, Miles, who happened to be asleep with Nate in the living room, right next to the porch. I remember asking John Paul to play quietly so he didn't wake up the baby.

I HAD ME A GIRL

This song always conjures up an image of a glass of whiskey and a lit cigarette. It's a little brooding. A little dangerous. It smolders. It has swagger and grit. It's full of innuendo and Southern Gothic tones. I love the feel of this track, and the way this song came together on the record. "I Had Me a Girl" is one of those musical moments that makes me wish I knew how to play electric guitar. Or any guitar, for that matter.

SAME OLD SAME OLD

This song, to me, represents the ache of monogamy. This isn't an "I'm leaving you" song. It's a vulnerable confession of "I don't want to leave. I want to work on this -- with you." Having said that, someone once told me a story about long-term relationships: to think of them as a continent to explore. I could spend a lifetime backpacking through Africa, and I would still never know all there is to know about that continent. To stay the course, to stay intentional, to stay curious and connected -- that's the heart of it. But it's so easy to lose track of the trail, to get tired, to want to give up, or to want a new adventure. It can be so easy to lose sight of the goodness and mystery within the person sitting right in front of you. That continent idea inspires me, and makes the ache when it comes hurt a little less. To know that it happens to all of us. What I'm realizing now is that sometimes the "same old same old" can actually be rich, worthwhile and a great adventure.

DUST TO DUST

This song is an anthem for the lonely. Sometimes you come across somebody who thinks they are hiding their pain, but if we are all honest, nobody is very good at it. "You're like a mirror, reflecting me. Takes one to know one, so take it from me.” When John Paul and I wrote this late one night in Birmingham, England, we decided to change the pronoun at the end of the song. We wanted to represent that we all experience loneliness in our lives.

EAVESDROP

We brought in our producer, Charlie Peacock, on this song. He helped with arrangements and really helped take the song to a totally different place. Sometimes as an artist, you can't see what needs re-arranging when you're so "in it." Charlie brought perspective. Almost like an eavesdrop within an "Eavesdrop."
Strangely enough, this song always reminds me that my voice has changed since the last album. I have my son to thank for that, truly. When I was first pregnant and performing on the road, I thought something was wrong with my voice. I was having a hard time hitting high notes, while my low notes kept getting deeper and deeper. I did some research with the help of a vocal coach, and learned that hormone levels affect a female singing range. Having a boy, naturally, upped my testosterone levels, making low notes easier to hit and higher notes harder to reach. But the great thing? After having Miles, I regained my high range AND have kept my low range. Pregnancy literally changed the makeup of my vocal cords. There's a different timbre to it now, and I love that I can hear the story of my son in my singing.

DEVIL'S BACKBONE

This song is our take on an Americana murder ballad. It's dark, prickly, anxious. It was fun writing because we just imagined some dust-bowl scenario, a broke-down town, and a man awaiting being hung for something he did in the name of trying to provide for his family. The woman who loves him is watching him standing there on the gallows.
This song always reminds me of when the melody first came to mind. I was doing my makeup in the tiled bathroom upstairs, with my newborn Miles in a yellow rocking bassinet next to me. I started singing, and turned on the voice memo app on my iPhone so I wouldn't forget it. As I sang, Miles started cooing along with me. Not on pitch, mind you, but I'd move a note, and he'd move a note. I'm never deleting that voice memo. It's become one of my favorites.

FROM THIS VALLEY

That's our Grand Ole Opry song. A new spiritual. It's actually the oldest song written on the album. We wrote it before Barton Hollow came out. Even though we didn't have our own recording of it, we started performing it live and it became a fan favorite. It made sense to finally put it on an album. One of my favorite moments on stage every night was singing the a cappella part together.

TELL MAMA

We recorded the performance at Fame studio in Muscle Shoals, a place we'd written a few songs before that made it onto Barton Hollow. I always felt the musical ghosts in that studio, one of whom was the great Etta James. We're a band that's known for covering songs live in our own way, and we thought it would be fun to take a stab at "Tell Mama." I found out later that where we recorded was the same room she recorded her version. That might explain why I kept getting goosebumps.

OH HENRY

We wrote it one week before Barton Hollow, in the mountains of Salt Lake City during our first Sundance Festival. We conjured up a story about a woman who was married to a philandering man. She is begging her man to level with her, and letting him know she can only take so much, a la "it's gonna kill me or it's gonna kill you."

DISARM

Again, we're the band who loves to do covers. Both John Paul and I have always been huge Smashing Pumpkins fans. Nate mentioned it might be a cool cover, and we actually wound up working it out the same day that we wrote "Oh Henry" up in Salt Lake City for Sundance. It turned into another on-stage staple that people asked for every night. We found out later from his then-manager that Billy dug it.

SACRED HEART

We wrote this song in a flat in Paris, with the Eiffel Tower in full view on a cold night. Tall windows, Victorian furniture, and somehow the atmosphere of all of that seeped into the song. Nate and our friends were there in the room as we wrote, all of us drinking wine together. I also loved getting to try out my flawed French. I wrote what words I knew in French, and then had a Parisian friend named Renata Pepper (yes, that's her real name) look it over later and help me translate. When we recorded the song for the album, I called in a French professor from Vanderbilt named Becky Peterson, who has now become a good friend.

D'ARLINE

We wrote this song in the studio behind my house in Nashville, on a warm summer day, with the windows and doors open. This song is a sweet lament, of loss and the belief that you'll never be able to love anybody else again. I stumbled across "Letters of Note" on Twitter, and was struck by the title of a letter written by a famous physicist named Richard Feynman: "I love my wife. My wife is dead." A little over a year after her death, he wrote his wife a love letter and sealed it. It was written in 1946, and wasn't opened until after his death in 1988. He ended his note to his long-lost wife with "Please excuse my not mailing this -- but I don't know your new address."
Another aside to this song: While we were recording the song together, John Paul and I could hear crows cawing in the background that I've since named Edgar, Allen and Poe. This recording and performance of the song is the first and only in existence, a work tape recorded simply on my iPhone.

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1. The One That Got Away - 3.32
2. I Had Me a Girl - 3.45
3. Same Old Same Old - 3.48
4. Dust to Dust - 3.49
5. Eavesdrop - 3.35
6. Devil's Backbone - 2.29
7. From This Valley - 3.33
8. Tell Mama - 3.48
9. Oh Henry - 3.32
10. Disarm - 4.42
11. Sacred Heart - 3.19
12. D'Arline - 3.06

Art-Nr.: 8264
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Rock; Country
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 13,90

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Dailey & Vincent - patriots & poets [2017]
Dailey & Vincent, die begnadeten Bluegrass-Helden sind wieder da mit einem neuen Album. "Patriots & Poets" ist eine liebevolle Hommage an ihre Heimat, präsentiert in 15 großartigen, neuen Acoustic Country-/Bluegrass-Songs, die Jamie Dailey und Darrin Vicent einmal mehr in der Blüte ihrens Schaffens zeigen. Was die Beiden und ihre exzellenten Mitstreiter wieder einmal musikalisch abliefern, ist "allererste Sahne". Brillante Instrumentenbeherrschung, brillanter Gesang, brillante Songs. Das Album ist erneut eine absolute "Bluegrass-Perle".

Hier ein Original U.S.-Review:

From time to time an album comes along with exactly the right message and meaning at exactly the right time - "Patriots & Poets" is one of those albums. Dailey and Vincent initially set out to create a project full of songs they had written independently, together and with close friends. While succeeding mightily in that regard, they also created a beautiful love letter to America and her people in a time when many need to be reminded, that while perhaps flawed, we are all still one. Faith and patriotism, as the title suggests, remain focal points throughout, evident by songs such as "God's Love," a solid gospel tune featuring Doyle Lawson, and "Unsung Heroes," a tribute to the working man and all those who get little acclaim for their contributions. In contrast is "California," a tongue in cheek tune about a country boy trapped in the big city. Perhaps the most progressive album to date from D+V, it is packed with top-shelf talent. Rob Ickes, Stuart Duncan, Steve Martin and Bela Fleck in turn are sprinkled throughout, adding their own unique flavor. This recording pushed the limits of what is considered bluegrass music and could be classified as Americana or possibly even folk. What remain consistent are those brother-like harmonies that have been a staple of D+V for 10 years running. Dailey and Vincent, along with many long-time friends, have created not just an enjoyable recording, but also a meaningful and patriotic celebration of music. (Devin Adams / Country Standard Time)

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1. Gimme All the Love You - 2.57
2. Beautiful Scars - 4.11
3. Baton Rouge - 3.05
4. Until We're Gone - 4.12
5. Bill and Ole Elijah - 3.41
6. Unsung Heros - 4.05
7. Spring Hill - 3.34
8. God's Love - 2.30
9. California - 4.57
10. Here Comes the Flood - 5.18
11. That Feel Good Music - 3.16
12. He's Been So Good to Me - 3.04
13. No Place Love Won't Go - 5.14
14. That's What We're Put Here To Do - 2.49
15. America, We Love You - 3.04

Art-Nr.: 9419
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Country
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 16,90

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Gomes, Anthony - live [2008]
Anthony Gomes, aus Toronto/Kanada stammend, gehört schon seit Jahren zu den ganz heiß gehandelten "jungen Wilden" des kanadischen und amerikanischen Bluesrock-Circuits - völlig zu Recht. 2 Jahre nach dem großartigen "Music is the medicine" kommt er mit seinem ersten Live-Album - und hier ist der vitale "guitarslinger" und mit einer ordentlichen Röhre ausgestattete Sänger erst richtig in seinem Element. Die Luft brennt am 27. Februar 2007 im kleinen "Triple Door"-Club von Seattle, an dem die Aufnahmen mitgeschnitten wurden, denn Gomes und seine Mannen entfachen ein dynamisches und explosive Feuerwerk, das sowohl der Band als auch dem Publikum eine Menge Freude bereitet. Das ist deutlich spürbar. Der Bursche ist ein hervorragender Entertainer, der das Publikum prima in seine Show involviert. Der Sound ist druckvoll und dicht, die Atmosphäre kommt bestens rüber. Klar ist, das Gomes mit seiner starken Stimme und vor allen Dingen seinem heißen, "wilden", glühendem, von großen Fähigkeiten geprägten Gitarrenspiel im Mittelpunkt des Geschehens steht, doch niemals, und das kommt richtig gut, allzu dominant. Vielmehr werden seine 3 Mitstreiter Todd Hamric (Orgel, Piano), Denis Palatin (Drums) und Biscuit Miller (Bass) nahezu gleichberechtigt eingebunden, was einen sehr kompakten Bandsound ergibt. Hamric's klasse Orgel- und Klavierarbeit verleiht den ausgelassenen Gitarrenexkursionen von Gomes zusätzliche Fülle und die Rhythmusfraktion sorgt für einen exzellenten, teils schön funkigen, überaus rhythmischen Groove, der jederzeit dazu beiträgt, die Temperatur in dem Schuppen weiter anzuheizen. Das Material des gut 61-minütigen Mitschnitts stammt neben insgesamt 5 Songs aus "Music is the medicine" (diese allerdings erhalten durch ihre dampfenden Instrumentalpassagen, bei denen sich neben Gomes auch alle anderen Bandmitglieder ordentlich austoben dürfen, und die ausgedehnte Performance ein völlig neues Gesicht), auch aus einigen Songs aus Gomes' früheren Werken und einer starken Coverversion des Led Zeppelin-Klassikers "Heartbreaker"! Eine erstklassige Rock-/Funk-/Groove-/Blues-/Power-Show voller Drive und aufgeheizter Spielfreude. Ein Mitarbeiter, dessen Zitat im Innenteil des Booklets abgedruckt ist, schreibt über den Besuch dieses Konzertes: "The place was packed, they came from all around, there was a buzz in the air, the lights went down, Gomes came out, and he was the Sh*t. He could play guitar like there was no tomorrow. When he started to sing, I was floored". Na dann, lass es krachen, Anthony...

Die komplette Tracklist:
1. Countdown - 0:15   
2. Up 2 Zero - 3:31   
3. Bluebird - 7:44   
4. Heartbreaker - 5:30   
5. Prelude in Blues - 1:50   
6. When the Right Woman Does You Wrong - 8:29   
7. Falling - 3:32   
8. War on War - 7:04   
9. Won't Let You Down - 6:45   
10. Music Is the Medicine - 6:15   
11. Wings of a Song - 5:40   
12. Testify - 4:38

Art-Nr.: 5553
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Rock
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 15,90

In folgende Titel können Sie reinhören:
Up 2 zero
When the right woman does you wrong
War on war
Wings of a song
Testify

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Horsehead - sympathetic vibrations [2012]
Grandios! Brian Robbins vom in Fachkreisen überaus renommierten Webzine "jambands.com" ist völlig aus dem Häuschen und spricht von "one hell of an album". Man kann dies nur mit einem dicken Ausrufezeichen unterschreiben. Obwohl in der Breite noch immer weitestgehend unbekannt und lediglich unter Insidern ein Begriff, muss man das in Richmond/Virginia beheimatete Quartett Horsehead ohne jeden Zweifel als eine der stärksten und besten (Gitarren)Rootsrock-, Americana Rock-Bands der Gegenwart bezeichnen. Mit ihrem neuen Album "Sympathetic vibrations", ihrem bereits vierten, liefern sie (mal wieder) eine regelrechtes Musterbeispiel ganauso geradlinigen, straighten wie variantenreichen Rootsrocks ab. Nein, sie setzen Maßstäbe! 13 fantastische Songs präsentieren uns die Herren, genauso zeitlos wie aktuell, mal mit einem Hauch von Country- und Heartland Rock Anlagen, mal mit einem bluesigen Flair, staubig, erdig, "gritty", würzig, durchzogen von prächtig hängen bleibenden Hooklines und durchweg wunderbaren Melodien, dargeboten in vollendeter, musikalischer Qualität. Horsehead sind: Kopf, Produzent, Songwriter und Frontmann Jon Brown (lead vocals, guitar, percussion), Kevin W. Inge (lead guitar, pedal steel, piano, organ, background vocals), Randy Mendicino (bass) und Gregg Brooks (drums). Unterstützt wird die Band von einigen renommierten Gästen, wie zum Beispiel Drive-by Truckers' Jay Gonzales, der bei drei Stücken das Klavier bedient. Bestimmt werden die Arrangements vorwiegend von dem massiven, satten und dreckig erdigen Gitarrensound Brown's ind Inge's, die sich dabei vorbildlich ergänzen. Die Riffs stecken voller Saft und Kraft, die Lead Gitarren-Führung wirkt genauso spannend wie vertraut und eingängig, Dazu kommen einige herzhafte, flammende Soli, die die ganze Spielfreude der Band ausdrücken. Ergänzt wird dieses vielschichtige Gitarrengewand durch adäquat involvierte Klavier- und Orgel-Einsätze, und manchmal die herrlich eingebundene Pedal Steel von Kevin Inge. Es ist die pure Wonne dieser Band zuzuhören. Die Rolling Stones, Son Volt, Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers, The Band, The Black Crowes, The Jayhawks, Dan Baird, John Hiatt, die Bottle Rockets, Neil Young's Crazy Horse, alle hinterlassen irgendwie ein paar Spuren, aus denen Horsehead schließlich ihren unwiderstehlichen, eigenen Stil kreieren, der nur nach ihnen selbst klingt. Jon Brown drückt es so aus: "We don’t sound like anyone else, we sound like Horsehead". Ein paar Songbeispiele: "Darkened streets" ist ein ungemein erdiger, kraftvoller, mitreissender Rootsrocker mit einem leichten, unterschwelligen Crazy Horse- und Stones-Touch. Massive Gitarren bestimmen das Geschehen, die Melodie ist exzellent. Jon Brown singt großartig, Kevin Inge brilliert mit einem begnadeten, glühenden Gitarrensolo voller Leidenschaft - es ist eine Pracht. Das Feuer der Band springt unmittelbar auf den Zuhörer über. Wundervoll! Das anschließende, voller Dynamik und Schwung losrockende "Emptiest arms in the world" knüpft nahtlos an den Vorgänger an. Ein furioser, melodischer, abgehender "American Rock'n Roller" mit herrlichen Lead Gitarren-Linien und kernigen Riffs. Geradezu magisch schraubt sich der Song in unsere Gehörgänge und will nicht mehr weichen. Hammer! Einen Hauch von Countryrock-Feeling versprüht das mit traumhaften Pedal Steel-Klängen verzierte "Get up". Beginnt wunderbar locker und flockig, wird zum Ende hin aber immer kraftvoller, dabei jedoch nicht weniger melodisch. Auch ein gewisses Heartland-Flair ist spürbar. Klingt fast wie eine Synthese aus Anlagen von Bruce Springsteen und den legendären New Riders Of The Purple Sage. Geht nicht? Und wie das geht! Horsehead kriegen das in beeindruckender Manier hin. Ultrastark auch der von gewaltigen, fetten Riffs bestimmte, straighte Rootsrocker "Big sun" mit seinem mächtigen, nach vorn gehenden Drumming. Inge spielt abermals ein tolles Gitarrensolo. Schön hier der dezent psychedelische Retro-Touch und die feinen Klavier-Ergänzungen. Das letzte Stück der Scheibe, die großartige Ballade "Candy (by the side of the west highway) bewegt sich schließlich im schönen Roots-Fahrwasser der unvergessenen The Band. Doch welchen Song man sich auch anhört, einer ist stärker als der andere. Die Truppe besticht mit unglaublicher Qualitäts-Kontinuität. Keine Frage, "Sympathetic Vibrations" ist ein absolutes Rootsrock-/Americana Rock-Meisterwerk!

Hier noch das eingangs erwähnte, begeisternde Review von "jambands.com" im Original:

Go ahead – reel off your favorite alt-country/Americana/whatever-you-want-to-call-it albums of all time … the seminal statements of the genre. What would be on the list? Son Volt’s Trace ? Whiskeytown’s Faithless Street ? Hollywood Town Hall by The Jayhawks? Wilco’s A.M. ? Whatever the albums are, what about them grabs ahold of you? Smart lyrics and a stone-real delivery? A haybale punk vibe? Garage pop crossed with Exile On Main Street -style cellar funk? Twanging crunch? Crunchy twang?

Here – have some of all of the above. World, meet Horsehead. The album is Sympathetic Vibrations – their fourth – and I humbly offer it up as being real and good and raggedy and right.
Sympathetic Vibrations delivers – name your poison, bucko. The album enters softly with “Moving Target” – just Horsehead principals Jon Brown and Kevin W. Inge (the self-proclaimed “Dimmer Twins”). Brown leads the way on vocals with acoustic guitar in hand, while Inge infuses the tune with wisps of keys and lovely pedal steel. By the way, it’s worth noting that the frigging guy – Inge – basically taught himself pedal for this album. If you’re not familiar with the beast’s workings – foot pedals, knee levers, ten strings and all – then Inge’s accomplishment might be lost on you. Trust me – there are folks who’ve been pickers all their lives who wouldn’t dare get near a pedal steel in a recording studio. Inge may be a rookie steeler, but he handles it like a seasoned pro, adding washes of sparkle amongst the grit on “Get Up” and putting the thing on full stun for “Spinning Your Wheels” with a slightly raspy-voiced tone that is absolutely beautiful.

Brown is the band’s lead voice and tunesmith. The album’s 13 cuts show he knows how to convey his songs’ souls (and the characters who inhabit them) in short order – from the heartbroke, dirt-streaked weariness of “God Damned The Rain To Fall” (Travis Rinehart’s guest banjo completes the picture) to the ominous won’t-take-no-for-an-answer stalk of “Sweet On You”. On “Emptiest Arms In The World” Brown delivers the goods with flannel-shirted soul and the confidence of a man who could rebuild his own carburetor. And the good-byes of “Candy” leave you wishing him well and hoping like hell that he and that gal end up together in a good place.

Bassist Randy Mendicino ended up swapping rhythm partners midway through the Sympathetic Vibrations session when longtime drummer Andre LaBelle left the band and Gregg Brooks settled in behind the kit. It’s a tribute to all three that the transition was a seamless one and only the liner notes tell the tale – there are no obvious splits between the Mendicino/LaBelle and Mendicino/Brooks tunes. Dig the nuts-on lurch of “Darkened Streets” (think vintage Molina/Talbot slam – and listen for the “Norwegian Wood” tease in the guitar break); the driving rhythm of “Running For The Door” tears along like a cousin to Tommy Tutone’s “867-5309” before Brooks and Mendicino shift gears and go into full surf mode; “Wasting Time” is big and majestic – beat-down, but not without pride just the same.

Multi-instrumentalist Inge (we’ve already discussed his grossly-amazing pedal steel contributions) is all over this thing: doubling up with Brown on guitar here … adding some organ here … a bit of piano here … a master of divining what a particular tune needs – no more and no less. Horsehead buddy (and Drive-By Trucker) Jay Gonzales sits in on piano for a couple of tunes, the most notable being the walloping rocker “Big Sun”.

“Big Sun” alone could sell you on Horsehead: wicked grab-you-by-both-ears opening guitar riffs; big bass swoops and straight-ahead drumming; enough crash-and-thrash to get your attention before settling into the palm-muted chug of the verses. Brown tells his tale perfectly about the folder at a laundromat who “smelled of soap and cigarettes.” It’s obvious the story can go only go one way – and the fact that the song evolves into a total guitar workout is the perfect way to tell the tale. The song fades at about the 5-minute mark, but comes roaring back with an eff-you-we’re-not-done attitude: Mendicino and Brown join forces while Brooks rolls and tumbles in glorious drum ecstasy; and Inge simply plays the piss out of his six-string. Of all the titles Horsehead wears well, “Big Sun” proves that above all, they are one hell of a rock and roll band.

And beyond that, Sympathetic Vibrations is one hell of an album.

(Brian Robbins)

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1. Moving Target - 2:42
2. Darkened Streets - 5:07
3. Emptiest Arms in the World - 3:40
4. Hard Hand to Hold - 4:40
5. Get Up - 4:11
6. God Damned the Rain to Fall - 3:56
7. Running for the Door - 3:50
8. John Adams - 4:32
9. Spinning Your Wheels - 3:34
10. Big Sun - 6:14
11. Wasting Time - 5:04
12. Sweet On You - 3:19
13. Candy (By the Side of the West Highway) - 4:00

Art-Nr.: 8055
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Rock
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 15,90

In folgende Titel können Sie reinhören:
Darkened streets
Emptiest arms in the world
Hard hand to hold
Get up
Running for the door
Big sun
Candy (by the side of the west highway)

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House and The Blues Cowboys, James - same [2018]
James House, eigentlich im Country zuhause und einer der gefragtesten Songwriter Nashville's, gelingt mit seinen großartigen "Blues Cowboys" ein famoser "Sidestep" in, der Name der Formation lässt es schon vermuten, die Gefilde des Blues und Bluesrocks. Wenn man das hier hölrt, kann man kaum glauben, dass der Bursche etwas mit Country am Hut hat. Denn was er hier abliefert ist rauer, dreckiger, erdiger, Staub- und Whiskey-gegerbter, ungeschliffener Rootsrock, Bluesrock und Southern-Blues voller natürlicher Ecken und Kanten. Die Songs sind kompakt und stark geprägt von dem rauen Gesang und dem klasse (Slide)-Gitarrenspiel des Protagonisten. Das ist der erdige Blues(rock) aus den Honky Tonks Nashville's.

Hier zwei Original-Reviews aus den USA:

Like many in Nashville, James House has a built a career of writing hit songs for others. If you’ve not heard of House, you have probably heard these tunes that have reached well int the millions for radio spins – “A Broken Wing,” “Ain’t That Lonely Yet” and “In a Week or Two.” Count Rod Stewart, Tina Turner, The Mavericks, Dwight Yoakam and Martina McBride, among others who have benefitted from House’s pen. Yet, this prolific and versatile musician has a powerhouse Michael McDonald -like voice that should have him in the lead role more often. His recent work writing for Joe Bonamassa and Beth Hart had fans wanting House to do his own blues, roots-rock album. And, like so many in Nashville, who ply their craft in country and Americana worlds, House has always had a love for the blues and it’s been an undercurrent for much of his work. Thus, the self-titled James House and the Blues Cowboys. The Blues Cowboys is indeed a touring band (more on that later) but these sessions were built around some of the best musicians in Music City. House lured them to his studio, Cabin in The Woods, located in a rural area of Nashville. Will Kimbrough plays lead guitar on the first five tracks (side A) while A-list session guitarist Kenny Greenberg joins blues guitarist Todd Sharp on the last 5 tracks (side B). Mike Bradford (Uncle Kracker) plays bass throughout as does drummer Crash Jones. Nashville’s most in-demand fiddler Eamon McGloughlin sits in on Side A while House sings and plays his Fender Strat and organ throughout. That kind of arsenal is built for fire and the sparks fly immediately on “Jail House Blues” with House wailing on lines like these – “Mama killed Daddy in self-defense/Never was one to sit on the fence” as Kimbrough’s slide duels with House’s guitar. “Arkansas Woman’ and “Ain’t No Way” continue the soul aching blues vibe until reaching on of disc’s outstanding tracks “Long Way Down.” It’s taken at a slower, haunting tempo as if John Lee Hooker were singing verses from William Faulkner. “Well Ran Dry” on Side B carries a similar approach. How about this lyric? “I’m an empty soul/At the holy water bowl/Waiting on a rising tide.” Other highlights on Side b include the more roots driven “Gone Again” and the rock tune “Ballad of the TKIngs,” short for Troubadour Kings. Now, let’s go to the touring Blues Cowboys. Singer/guitarist Roddy Romero who just joined Yvette Landry for her recent release, if from Lafayette Louisiana as is lesser know drummer/percussionist Smoove Ras. They back House on the final cut, “What Side of the River Are You on?” the song was inspired by House attending the Buddy Holly Songwriting Retreat and listening to Mary Gauthier sing Guthrie’s “This Land Is Your Land” along the river in Lafayette. In a songwriting meeting with Romero and Ras, his vision for The Blues Cowboys was shaped. Great songs, achingly powerful vocals, and first-in-class musicians make this a terrific album. House has already indirectly put his stamp on contemporary blues with his work with Joe Bonamassa and Beth Hart. Now he’s set to make his mark directly with the Blues Cowboys. - Glide Magazine

James House deserves to be better known — or, more accurately, known more widely. He’s co-written several songs with blues guitarist Joe Bonamassa, including Bonamassa’s recent song “Redemption.” House is also a Grammy-, CMA-, and ACM-nominated songwriter, but on his new album, James House and The Blues Cowboys, he weaves rock, blues, and roots music into a colorful pattern that reveals many facets. House’s powerful, sometimes raw, vocals dominate, and he can moan with the best blues-shouters but can be as tender as the best of the balladeers. The new album serves as a showcase for his songwriting, singing, and guitar work. He gathered a group of world-class musicians — Will Kimbrough, Kenny Greenberg, Lou Toomey, Todd Sharp, Roddie Romero on guitars; Michael Bradford and Mike Brignardello on bass; Eamon McLoughlin on fiddle; Crash Jones and Smoov-Ras on drums — at his studio, Cabin in the Woods, to record the album. The album opens with a can’t-sit-still, shake-us-to-our-core blues rocker “Jail House Blues.” The raucous, bone-shaking song lifts us so high, we wonder if it can get any better than this. It does. “Long Way Down” opens with a slow funk with blues moan, but then escalates to a burning rocker in the chorus and the bridge, fueled by guitars reminiscent of Alvin Lee and Ten Years After. “Good Love” features a spacious, atmospheric vibe that allows House’s raw vocals to breathe and to call and respond to Kimbrough’s lead riffs. “Arkansas Woman” is one of the highlights of the album. There’s a place for every note, every chord, and every word, and the song wrings every emotion out of us by its end. Kimbrough’s soulful lead guitar brings this song to life in a way such that every note he plays makes a statement. While some of the playing is reminiscent of Eric Clapton’s leads, the difference here is that Kimbrough never wastes a note; both he and Clapton play clean and crisp, but while Clapton’s crispness is soulless, Kimbrough’s inhabits our souls and hearts and touches us with its depth. The layered riffs that open “Boomerang” mirror the action of the object itself — the riffs always come back, circling around and flying high before returning to start over again. The propulsive tune mimics the halting/forward-moving character of love: “We keep coming back to you and me.” The scalding lead riffs on the song’s bridge balance the pain of leaving with the tentative joy of returning and the inability to throw love far away; it always returns to you. “Which Side of the River You On” turns in a down-and-dirty, funky twist to that old folk tune by Florence Reece, “Which Side Are You On?” In this tune, which House co-wrote with Roddie Romero and Joshua Martin, and which features Romero and Smoov-Ras, shimmers with a roiling slide guitar, and with an insistent funk beat asks, “which side of the river you on / Ain’t saying which is right or wrong / When the flood comes down / It’s too late to get to higher ground.” Listen to this album! Words can’t always describe how perfect, how moving, how powerful some of the songs on the album are. James House and The Blues Cowboys is an album that’s meant to be played and to be played loud, and it won’ let you forget James House. - No Depression / By Henry Carrigan, Staff Reviewer

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1. Long Way Home - 3:06
2. Arkansas Woman - 3:11
3. Ain't No Way - 3:09
4. Long Way Down - 3:42
5. Good Love - 3:47
6. Moving on Over - 3:59
7. Well Ran Dry - 3:31
8. Gone Again - 4:13
9. Boomerang - 3:07
10. Ballad of the Troubadour Kings - 3:40
11. Which Side of the River - 3:47

Art-Nr.: 9680
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Rock
Status: Neuheit || Typ: CD || Preis: € 15,90

In folgende Titel können Sie reinhören:
Long way home
Arkansas woman
Ain't no way
Long way down
Movin' on over
Well ran dry
Which side of the river

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Indigenous - broken lands [2008]
"Native American Guitarslinger" Mato Nanji und seine Freunde mit einem traumhaften, neuen Album! So wunderbar kann Roots-based Bluesrock sein! Als Indigenous vor rund 10 Jahren die Bühne des Bluesrock-Circuits betraten, schlugen Mato mit seinem atemberaubenden, oft an Stevie Ray Vaughan erinnernden Gitarrenspiel, sein Bruder Pte am Bass, seine Schwester Wanbodi am Schlagzeug und Cousin Horse (Percussion), alle dem Stamm der Nakota-/Sioux-Indianer angehörend, ein wie eine "Bombe". Sie waren, und sind es natürlich auch heute noch, so etwas wie die neue Vorzeige-Institution harten, intensiven, mit einem deutlichen Jam-Spirit durchzogenen Gitarren-Bluesrocks! Was hat sich nach einer Dekade geändert? Aus der ehemaligen "Familienbande" ist nur noch Mato übrig geblieben. Die anderen haben sich in aller Freundschaft, ohne den Hauch von Meinungsverschiedenheiten, mittlerweile anderen Aufgaben zugewandt, und Mato führt das Projekt "Indigenous" mit neuen Musikern und neuem Elan weiter. "Everybody decided to go their own way, leaving me to carry on Indigenous," sagt Mato zu dieser Entwicklung. "Playing with my family for 10 years was a lot of fun, but it was time to grow." So rekruierte er zusätzlich den großartigen Slide-Gitarristen Kris Lager, den Keyboarder Jeremiah Weir, Bassist Aaron C. Wright, Drummer Kirk Stallings und Percussionist Chico Perez in die Band (zum Teil war diese Truppe auch schon beim Vorgänger "Chasing the sun" mit an Bord), deren erstes gemeinsames Resultat auf CD nun das fantastische "Broken land" ist. Nich mehr ganz so intensiv wie früher, aber nicht minder kraftvoll und vor allen Dingen ungeheuer inspiriert, tendiert die Musik von "Broken lands", das thematisch einiges über die Historie und das Leben in den Reservaten zu erzählen hat, etwas mehr in Richtung Roots- und American Heartland Rock, was unter dem Strich zu einer grandiosen Synthese aus Roots- und Bluesrock führt: Traumhaftem Roots-based Bluesrock! Tolle Melodien, hinreißende Grooves, großartig hängen bleibende Strukturen, und doch diese Verspieltheit, dieses Fließende, diese unterschwellige Jam-Freude und dieser stets spürbare Hang, irgendwann zu einem dieser, von lässiger Percussion unterstützten, glühenden, unwiderstehlichen Gitarren-Ausflüge anzusetzen. Mato Nanji's "heroes" wie Stevie ray vaughan, Jimi Hendrix, Carlos Santana, aber auch Los Lobos, Gov't Mule oder gar John Mellencamp hinterlassen dabei durchaus ihre Spuren. Auch eine Menge Southern-Esprit ist immer wieder spürbar. Der wunderbare Gitarrensound, durch den zweiten Gitarristen noch vielschichtiger geworden, wird immer wieder durch dezente, aber prägnante Orgel- und Klavierklänge bereichert. Es passt einfach prächtig. Und Mato's Gesang war nie besser! Herrlich bluesige Riffs und wundervolle, erdige, würzige Gitarrenlicks bestimmen den kraftvollen, dennoch sehr gediegen wirkenden, von einer großartigen Melodie und lässigem Groove geprägten, seeligen Roots-/Bluesrocker "Should I stay", der unsere verwöhnten Roots-/Blues-Ohren unverzüglich in einen Zustand angenehmsten Wohlbefindens und höchster Zufriedenheit versetzt, der sich auch im weiteren Verlauf des Albums zu keiner Minute mehr verflüchtigt. Toller Refrain mit schönem Background-Gesang von Mato's Gattin Leah Nanji (zudem, bis auf eine Ausnahme, Co-Writerin aller Songs), brennendes Gitarrensolo von Mato! Was für ein Start in dieses grandiose Album! Nicht minder stark geht's mit dem langsamen, erneut sehr melodischen, aber kraftvollen, rootsig-bluesigen "Eyes of a child" weiter (tolle Bottleneck-Arbeit von Kris Lager), ehe die Energie mit dem kernigen, von großartigen, parallel zum Gesang eingesetzten Gitarrenlicks und straighten, satten Riffs bestimmten Knaller "Place I know" deutlich zunimmt. Hat gut Dampf! Klasse Jam-Feeling! In dem fast 3-minütigen, von einem tollen Percussion-Groove getragenen Instrumentalfinish brilliert Mato mit wunderbaren Gitarrenläufen. Teilweise hat man den Eindruck, drei Gitarristen führen einen glühenden Schlagabtausch! Flüssig, jammig, locker, voller spürbarer Spielfreude, frisch und lässig geht es bei dem flockigen "All I want to see" zur Sache, ehe man mit "I can't pretend" zu einer hinreißenden, von kochenden E-Gitarren und wunderschönen, klaren Linien geprägten, herrlich melodischen, rootsigen Heartland Rock-/Bluesrock-Ballade ansetzt, die sicher bei dem ein oder anderen pure Gänsehaut entfachen dürfte. Großartig hier die dezente Orgel-/Piano-Untermalung in Verbindung mit den transparenten Gitarren. Ungemein stark beispielsweise auch der semi-akustische Blues-Shuffle "All night long" mit toller Acoustic-Slide, der trockene, dynamische, von zwischen Hendrix und SRV liegenden Riffs geprägte, straighte Bluesrocker "Just can't hide", der ordentlich abgehende, sehr knackige und melodische Uptempo-Bluesrocker "Make a change" (toller Schlagzeug-Drive, tierisches Electric Lead-/Slide-Guitar Wechsel-Solo im Break), oder die rootsige, voller Southern-Spirit steckende (die Licks erinnern gar entfernt an Lynyrd Skynyrd), mit wundervollen, vielschichtigen Gitarren und großartigen, glühenden Soli gespickte Ballade "Waiting", mit der das Album genauso stark endet, wie es gut 54 Minuten zuvor begonnen hatte. Nach den Veränderungen in der Band herrscht bei Mato Nanji und seinen Freunden eine regelrechte Aufbruchstimmung, die sich wunderbar in der Musik widerspiegelt. "'Broken Lands' makes me feel like I did when Indigenous was just starting out," sagt Nanji. "We were excited about making music and making records, and maybe getting to tour all over the United States, which we did. Now Indigenous is a new band again and I feel that same excitement, but this time, when we start touring in August, I want to take these new songs and this great sounding band all over the world." Wir nehmen Dich beim Wort, Mato! Laßt Euch mal in unseren Gefilden blicken, die Fans werden Euch zu Füßen liegen! Bis dahin (und darüber hinaus), ergötzen wir uns an diesem famosen Album! "Broken land" ist einfach wunderbar!

Die Tracklist:

1 Should I Stay - 4:12   
2 Eyes of a Child - 4:57   
3 Place I Know - 5:16   
4 All I Want to See - 4:33   
5 I Can't Pretend - 4:24   
6 All Night Long - 3:58   
7 Just Can't Hide - 4:28   
8 Make a Change - 3:33   
9 It's Alright with Me - 4:43   
10 Let It Rain - 3:56   
11 Still Remember - 4:30   
12 Waiting - 5:39

Art-Nr.: 5913
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Rock
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 16,90

In folgende Titel können Sie reinhören:
Should I stay
Place I know
All I want to see
I can't pretend
Make a change
Waiting

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Lynyrd Skynyrd - last of a dyin' breed ~ special edition [2012]
Special edition with 4 Bonustracks!

Das neue Lynyrd Skynyrd-Album! Wir haben die erweiterte Original U.S.-"Special Edition"-Ausgabe mit 4 zusätzlichen Tracks!

Aus der Original-Produktbeschreibung:

Legendary rock band Lynyrd Skynyrd releases a fiery slice of Southern style guitar rock heaven in Last of a Dyin' Breed. This is the kind of record guaranteed to feed the needs of the multi-generational Skynyrd Nation, and continue the renewed vigor the band exhibited with their previous album, 2009's God & Guns. For the passionate, longtime fans of the band, this is Skynyrd at the top of their game, complete with instantly memorable songs, more hooks than a tackle box, and a blistering three-guitar attack at full power.

Led by core members Gary Rossington (guitar), Johnny Van Zant (vocals) and Rickey Medlocke (guitar), along with longtime drummer Michael Cartellone, Skynyrd has recorded an album that continues to build on the legacy that began over 35 years ago in Jacksonville, Florida. Joining them in the studio and on the road are new bassist Johnny Colt (The Black Crowes, Train) guitarist Mark "Sparky" Matejka (a "Nashville cat, just a pickin' fool," according to Rossington), and keyboardist Peter Keys, who replaced Powell on the God & Guns tour.

Last Of A Dyin' Breed re-ignites the in-studio alchemy the band found with Guns producer Bob Marlette, and the sound is traditional Skynyrd blended to perfection with the edge of immediacy. In short, it's rock n roll for the times.

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1. Last Of A Dyin' Breed
2. One Day At A Time
3. Homegrown
4. Ready To Fly
5. Mississippi Blood
6. Good Teacher
7. Something To Live For
8. Life's Twisted
9. Nothing Comes Easy
10. Honey Hole
11. Start Livin' Life Again
12. Poor Man's Dream [bonus track]
13. Do It Up Right [bonus track]
14. Sad Song [bonus track]
15. Low Down Dirty [bonus track]

Art-Nr.: 7883
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Rock
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 18,90

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Maddie & Tae - start here [2015]
Bärenstarkes Debutalbum des fantastisch harmonierendes Duos Maddie & Tae, das sind die beiden großartigen Singer-Songwriterinnen Maddie Marlow und Taylor Dye (an allen Songs sind sie kompositorisch beteiligt), die mit ihrer wunderbaren Musik nicht nur die Countryfans in Nashville, sondern auch die Kritiker und Experten begeistern. Ja, diese Mädels tun Nashville richtig gut. Mit ihren herausragenden Stimmen und ihrem vorzüglichen Songmaterial schaffen die beiden, und das macht sie so besonders, eine erstklassige Balance zwischen astreinen, schön traditionell fundamentierten, allerdings sehr zeitgemäß in Szene gesetzten Countrynummern (wie etwa der herrliche Opener "Waiting on a plane", der auch wunderbar in das Repertoire von nicht zu poppigen Lady Antebellum passen würde, oder das grandiose, flockige "Downside of growing up" mit seiner exzellenten Madolinen-, Gitarren-, Mundharmonika-, Banjo,- Pedal Steel-Begleitung, das auf der Schiene der überragende Ashley Monroe dargeboten wird) und sehr modernem New Country-Material, das auch mal auf poppiges "Programming" zurückgreift (wie zum Beispiel ihr großer Hit, das schmissige "Girl in a Country Song"), wobei jedoch niemals auch nur ansatzweise die "echte" Countrybasis aussen vorgelassen wird. Und dann diese Stimmen! Kein Frage, diese Mädels sind "real Country"! Mit an Bord sind solche 1a-Musiker wie etwa Dan Huff (der auch produzierte), Jimmy McPherson an den Gitarren, Paul Franklin und Dan Dugmore (Pedal Steel), Shannon Forest (Drums), Ilya Toshinskiy (Acoustic Guitar, Banjo, Mandoline), Stuart Duncan (Fiddle), und viele andere. "Maddie & Tae are far more than one-trick ponies. They stick to their guns on their full-length debut standing country proud", heisst es in einem amerikanischen Review. Dem kann man nur uneingeschränkt zustimmen. "Start here" ist ein super Start für die beiden, denen mit dieser prächtigen Musik eine blendende Karriere bevorstehen könnte. Weiter so, Mädels!

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1. Waitin on a Plane - 3.26
2. Girl in a Country Song - 3.37
3. Smoke - 3.01
4. Shut Up and Fish - 3.18
5. Fly - 3.37
6. Sierra - 2.45
7. Your Side of Town - 3.02
8. Right Here, Right Now - 3.37
9. No Place Like You - 3.19
10. After the Storm Blows Through - 3.42
11. Downside of Growing Up - 3.28

Art-Nr.: 8961
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Country
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 14,90

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Mathus, Jimbo & The Tri-State Coalition - white buffalo [2013]
Rural Guitar-Rootsrock, Americana, Mississippi Swamp-Rock, Delta-Blues, Alternative Country Rock, Hill Country Blues, Southern Soul - welcher dieser Bezeichnungen man für die mitreissende Musik dieser begnadeten Truppe auch verwenden mag, es passt immer. Jimbo Mathus und seine Band The Tri-Star Coalition (die Burschen kommen aus den drei verschiedenen U.S. Bundesstaaten Arkansas, Missouri und Mississippi) nennen es schlicht "Catfish Music". Sie legen mit ihrem neuen Album "White buffalo" geradezu ein Meisterwerk amerikanischer Roots-Musik hin. Mathus war der Kopf der sehr bekannten, mittlerweile aufgelösten, verrückten "Hyper-Ragtime" Rock-Formation Squirrel Nut Zippers, doch von seiner Herkunft und musikalischen Natur her ist der Mann aus Mississippi ein überaus produktiver, genialer Songwriter für durch und durch authentische "born-in-the-bone Southern music", ein Fahnenträger für die Kultur und die Mythologie des Südens. Genau das setzt er mit seiner fantastischen Band (neben Jimbo Mathus: lead vocals, lead guitar, mandolin sind das Matt Pierce: Telecaster guitar, Eric Carlton: keyboards, Terence Bishop: bass und Ryan Rogers: drums) auf beeindruckende, packende Art und Weise um. Jimbo Mathus beschreibt den "Tri-Stste"-Sound als "a true Southern amalgam of blues, white country, soul and rock'n roll". Besser kann man's nicht ausdrücken. Und die Musik der Truppe hat richtig Feuer. Bestimmt wird sie vorwiegend von einem sehr transparenten, vielschichtigen Gitarrensound, immer wieder kongenial ergänzt durch Orgel- und/oder Piano-Untermalungen und einer knackig troscken agierenden Rhythmusfraktion. Es herrscht ein vorwiegend raues, durchaus dreckiges, zuweilen aber auch sehr natürliches, frisches Ambiente, gepaart mit wunderbaren Melodien, das durch eine exzellente, sehr klar abgestimmte, "tighte" Produktion perfekt in Szene gesetzt wird. Verantwortlich dafür zeichnet niemand Geringerer, als Roots-König Eric "Roscoe" Ambel (u.a. the Del Lords, The Yayhoos, Steve Earle). Es muss aber auch einen Heidenspass gemacht haben, dieses umwerfende Songmaterial ins richtige Licht zu rücken. Gleich die erste Nummer, "In the garden", ist ein Knüller: Trockene, wunderschöne Mandolinen-Riffs erklingen, Jimbo's ungemein inspirierter, ausdrucksstarker Gesang setzt ein und langsam kommt die ganze Band ins Rollen. Wir hören ein großartiges Akkordeon, dreckige E-Gitarren, dazu flüssige Telecaster-Linien, ein gewisses Soul- und Gospel-Flair und einen tollen, swampigen Groove. Southern-/Delta-/Rootsrock, der einen unwiderstehlich in seinen Bann zieht. Im Verlauf des Albums haut die Truppe dann einen Haufen krachender Rocker raus, wie etwa das fulminante, schwer kochende Titelstück "White buffalo", ein von massiven E-Gitarren (lichterloh brennendes, dreckiges Solo) und fetter Orgeluntermalung bestimmter Volldampf Roots-/Southern-/Bluesrocker, der gar einen Hauch von Hendrix verbreitet (allerdings auf Mississippi-/Roots-Terrain), oder das an die Georgia Satellites, aber auch an die North Mississippi Allstars erinnernde "Fake hex", besticht aber auch mit einigen hinreissnden (Alternative)Countrynummern, wie zum Beispiel das grandios arrangierte "Poor lost souls", das klingt, als sei es einer imaginären, gemeinsamen Session von Hank Williams, Johnny Cash, Gram Parsons und The Band entsprungen (tolle Akkordeon-Klänge, schöne Mandolinen-Fills und herrliche, "mehrstimmige" Gitarrenlinien). Bärenstark auch die knackige, erdige Ballade "Tennessee walker mare" mit ihrer großartigen Melodie, Mathus' tollem, angerauten Gesang und einem Gitarrenbreak, das gar an The Allman Brothers Band zu erinnern scheint. Es ist alles gesagt und doch wiederholen wir uns gerne noch einmal: Jimbo Mathus & The Tri-State Coalition's "White buffalo" ist schlichtweg ein Meisterwerk. Das ist sie, die grandiose, fesselnde "Catfish"-Musik des amerikanischen Südens!

Als Beispiel, wie dieses großartige Album in den Staaten aufgenommen wird, hier noch, für die, die es interessiert, die ausführliche, begeisternde Besprechung von Brian Robbins, vom renommierten und hoch geschätzten Webzine "jambands.com" im Original:

In 2011, I wrote a review of Jimbo Mathus’ Confederate Buddha album, referring to the music on it as “rooted deeply in Mathus’ beloved Mississippi Hill Country, but the messages contained within the dozen tracks came from – and reach out to – some place far, far away.” My feelings about Confederate Buddha still stand – it’s a hell of a piece of work. But let me tell you something right now, folks: I don’t know what sort of gris-gris Mathus and his Tri-State Coalition (bassist Ryan Rogers, drummer Terrence Bishop, keyboardist Eric Carlton, and guitarist Matt Pierce) called upon during the recording of White Buffalo, but they have conjured up some mighty, mighty fine tunes.
You don’t have to wait for the magic to take hold: Mathus’ sweet mandolin ushers in “In The Garden” while Jimbo doles out some philosophy and advice – rolled in flour and pan-fried to a golden brown by the Coalition, who fall in behind him midway through the first verse. Carlton’s accordion infuses the tune with a Delta vibe; Bishop and Rogers keep the beat simmering somewhere between the Scottish Highlands and a Tibetan mountaintop; Pierce pilots his Telecaster through some amazing twists and turns; and through it all, Mathus’ brave little mando carries the torch that lights the song’s soul. The White Buffalo is off and running.
The best way to get to the core of what this album is all about is to dive right into the middle of the beast: the amazingly eclectic-yet-perfectly-united trifecta of “White Buffalo”, “Hatchie Bottoms”, and “Fake Hex”. The title tune comes roaring out of the speakers with enough force to make you duck your head – all rolling and a’tumbling drums and ga-wooping bass and wailing guitars and flashes of wild-ass voodoo funk ::: JIMI! ::: but there’s not a Cuban heel nor bit of tie-dye in sight; this is flannel-shirted and raggedy-blue-jeaned get-down-to-it psychedelia – as real as the button missing on that there thermal t-shirt, my friend. No sooner has the wild-colored dust and vapors and cymbal sizzles from “White Buffalo” settled than a gently-strummed acoustic guitar wraps its loving arms around you and takes you to “Hatchie Bottoms”. “In 20 and 10 I went back home again to the funeral of my Uncle Bobby …” sings Jimbo – and by the time the rest of the band has fallen into step, you are headed home as well, feeling every ounce of sweet and mournful ache ::: HANK! ::: that Jimbo and the boys lay on you. There’s hardly enough time to wipe your eyes before “Fake Hex” takes off, gee-tars all snapping and biting and chasing their tails in total Some Girls -era Stones glory ::: KEITH! ::: and it’s a hell of a mess Jimbo’s singing about (“Ever since I knew ya, you ain’t brought me nuthin’ but heartache”) but when they go roaring off into the wham/crash/wail of the bridge at 1:37, you’re helpless to do a thing except dance, dance, dance.
And that’s when you realize that what these crazy/talented bastards have managed to pull off is capturing the spirit of some sort of ::: JIMI! ::: HANK! ::: KEITH! ::: HOLY ROCK ‘N’ ROLL TRINITY – not by doing killer impressions or relying on plastic studio-created ambience … no, no, no. What Mathus and the Coalition have done is slow-boiled rock ‘n’ roll right down to its syrupy goodness, and then played it with every ounce of their collective beings – in a big ol’ room with big ol’ mics and a big ol’ vibe.
Sun Studios had it. Big Pink had it. The Basement Tapes and Motel Shot had it. And White Buffalo has it – a function of Mathus’ Delta Recording Service in Como, MS (an old high-ceilinged grocery store converted to a studio – that still shares a building with the local post office); a function of producer Eric “Roscoe” Ambel’s total grasp of who these players are and what they want to do; and a function of the players themselves knowing who they are and what they want to do.
Settling into White Buffalo is like hanging out in a cool old house where every chair is comfy; it’s chock full of moments to burrow into. Mathus’ and Matt Pierce’s harmonized guitar spirals on “Tennessee Walker Mare” are the sweetest you’ve heard since Dickey and Duane made the sun shine on “Blue Sky” while “Run Devil Run” will make the hair stand up your arms and have you brushing swamp vines out of your face that aren’t there.
“(I Wanna Be Your) Satellite” is a neat mix of crunch and velvet – a garage with a Wall Of Sound in the back. The boys lay down passages of cool doo-wop between the growled/yelped sing-‘em-like-you-feel-‘em verses. Eric Carlton’s cheesy-toned organ is the perfect glue; Ryan Rogers’ bass repeatedly builds the tune’s tension up and keeps things on edge; and pay attention to the start-stop-start drum roll that Terrence Bishop goes into at the 1:50 mark – one of the coolest bits of just-right-and-no-more rock rhythm laid down since Mickey Waller’s roll between the first and second verses of Every Picture Tells A Story. (Don’t take my word for it – go look it up.)
“Poor Lost Souls” is another tune whose words are of today, but whose soul comes straight out of an old AM radio speaker with Hank Williams doing the testifying for Mother’s Best Flour: “She’s just a lump of coal/but she could have been a diamond.” (Pierce tickles and prods his Tele into everything from Bakersfield ticky-tick rhythms to heartbreaker pedal steel-ish twang.) “Self?” is a study in introspection, honesty, and crunchy guitars; “Useless Heart” is more of the same – only different. Jay Bennett would’ve loved it.
Interplanetary honky tonk? Born-in-the-bone Americana? Yes and yes – and a few dozen other descriptions would fit, as well. It matters not what you call it, though – Jimbo Mathus and the Tri-State Coalition are playing your song.
Too early to start this year’s “Best Of” list? Nope. And White Buffalo is an easy pick.
(Brian Robbins/jambands.com)

Die komplette Tracklist:

1. In the Garden - 2:56
2. (I Wanna Be Your) Satellite - 2:39
3. Tennessee Walker Mare - 4:53
4. White Buffalo - 3:10
5. Hatchie Bottoms - 3:26
6. Fake Hex - 2:21
7. Poor Lost Souls - 3:42
8. Self? - 2:09
9. Run Devil Run - 4:02
10. Useless Heart - 3:37

Art-Nr.: 8033
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Rock
Status: Programm || Typ: CD || Preis: € 15,90

In folgende Titel können Sie reinhören:
In the garden
Tennessee walker mare
White buffalo
Fake hex
Poor lost souls
Self?
Useless heart

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Nail, David - fighter [2016]
Viertes Studioalbum des großartigen, "Grammy nominated" Sängers, der in den letzten Jahren zu einem, mit großen Charterfolgen aufwartenden, festen Bestandteil der Countryszene Nashville's geworden ist. Als Vertreter des "New Contemporary Country" koppelt David Nail überaus geschickt traditionelle Country-Grundlagen mit gepflegten, nicht allzu bombastischen, leicht poppigen Einüssen, ohne sich dabei jedoch "zu weit aus dem Fenster zu lehnen" und die Countrypfade zu weit zu verlassen. Das gelingt auch auf seinem neuen Werk "Fighter" wieder mit ausgezeichneter Qualität. Nail ist ein prächtiger Sänger, dem man all das, was er vorträgt auch wirklich abkauft. Er wirkt genauso emotional, wie authentisch und immer glaubwürdig. Das Songmaterial ist auf höchstem Level und sehr abwechslungsreich, geht von äußerst knackigen, fröhlichen Uptempo-Nummern wie das herrliche, wunderbar melodische und jede Menge gute Laune freisetzende "Good at tonight" (eingespielt zusammen mit Brothers Osborne) bis hin zu hinreissenden "Storytelling-Ballads", wie das fantastische, zusammen mit Lori McKenna (hat die Nummer auch mit komponiert) vorgetragene "Home" - und allem was dazweischen liegt. Da werden wieder jede Menge Hits abfallen, wie auch schon das so prima ins Ohr gehende, frische, kraftvolle "Night's on fire". Klasse Album! Eine absolute Glanzleistung von David Nail!

Hier noch ein Original U.S.-Review:

A singer's believability is essential to the success of any album, and David Nail has a way of persuading us that every word he sings on his "Fighter" comes straight from the heart. And it doesn't hurt that the songwriting contained within is topnotch throughout.
Two songs, in particular, go straight to the heart in addition to being heartfelt. "Home," which Lori McKenna both sings on and co-wrote, is the first song on this record that will absolutely stop you in your tracks. Built upon a stately acoustic guitar backing, after a lovely piano intro, the song's lyric beautifully personifies one's hometown in its chorus. "And you think it will forget you when you go/But you know it will take you back in." Sometimes, the place where you come from becomes as close as a blood relative, or as the lyric states it, is like "your oldest friend." With its keen insight, this song will remind you of Eric Church at his best.
"Babies," which describes how Nail became "a better kind of crazy" after having children, is the other song that touches all the right nerve endings. "Good things come to those who wait," he tells us in the chorus, "I used to think that's just something people say." Knowing Nail is actually a recent new father (twins in December 2015), only gives this song's personal lyrics all the more emotional weight.
Nail closes with "Old Man's Symphony," which doubles as a both a brief career overview, and also an ode to his father. Sung over finger picked guitar, before incorporating unobtrusive strings, the song eventually builds into a kind of folk-country symphony, if you will. It's a sweet, humble and sincere way to close an album.
The only misstep on "Fighter" is "Night's On Fire," which has one of those loud choruses that sounds more like a big Taylor Swift pop production number and jarringly contrasts with the (mostly) low key and overall uncomplicated production approach. It comes off as momentary compromise, on an otherwise uncompromising project.
Nail is not a name that usually gets mentioned (along with Chris Stapleton, Sturgill Simpson) when potential saviors of modern country music get mentioned, but "Fighter" is an album that proves this man now needs to be a part of that conversation.
(Dan MacIntosh/countrystandardtime.com)

Das komplette Tracklisting:

1. Good At Tonight [feat. Brothers Osborne] - 3:30
2. Night's On Fire - 3:09
3. Ease Your Pain - 2:58
4. Home [feat. Lori McKenna] - 5:55
5. Lie With Me - 2:50
6. I Won't Let You Go [feat. Vince Gill] - 5:32
7. Fighter - 4:36
8. Babies - 3:24
9. Got Me Gone - 3:11
10. Champagne Promise - 3:54
11. Old Man's Symphony [feat. Bear and Bo Rinehart] - 3:44

Art-Nr.: 9228
Gruppe: Musik || Sparte: Country
Status: Angebot || Typ: CD || Preis: € 6,90

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